Compendium of 1:1 Personal Interaction Types, illustrative

    • shooting the sh*t
    • watching a movie together
    • idle conversation
    • excited pointed conversation
    • argument
    • teaching
    • advising
    • joking around
    • poker playing
    • teaching martial art
    • therapy
    • counseling
    • meeting with agenda
    • brainstorming
    • interrogation
    • mediating
    • dialog
    • serious conversation
    • introduction
    • flirting
    • training
    • testing
    • poking
    • prodding
    • kissing
    • making love
    • arousing
    • titillating
    • fondling
    • massaging
    • spooning
    • f*cking
    • impressing
    • dating
    • marry
    • attracting
    • emanating?
    • glowing?
    • overpowering
    • torturing
    • tweaking / pushing buttons
    • hating
    • irritating
    • firing
    • hiring
    • recruiting
    • teasing
    • story telling
    • performing
    • killing
    • muting
    • spinning up
    • inspiring
    • encouraging
    • supporting
    • sympathizing
    • empathizing
    • co-creating with
    • co-authoring
    • co-evolving?
    • sitting with
    • sitting beside
    • driving with
    • travel with
    • pick up
    • drop off
    • enter commitment
    • insulting
    • complimenting
    • protecting
    • enveloping
    • appreciating
    • thanking
    • worshipping
    • honoring
    • respecting
    • celebrating
    • congratulating

 

Compendium of Document Types, illustrative

  • PhD Thesis
  • Novel
  • News article
  • Contract
  • Email
  • Academic Paper
  • Essay
  • White Paper
  • Obituary
  • Short Story
  • License
  • List
  • Summary
  • Brain Dump
  • Transcript
  • Playscript
  • Movie Script
  • Wikipedia article
  • CV
  • Resume
  • Identity — ooh… ahh
  • Photograph
  • TV show listing
  • FAQ
  • Product Description
  • User Manual
  • Service Manual
  • Advertisement
  • Poem
  • Love Letter
  • Scratchpad
  • Shopping List
  • Definition
  • Glossary
  • Wedding Announcement
  • Police Report
  • Insurance Policy
  • Credit Report
  • How-to instructions
  • Invoice
  • Principles
  • Practices
  • Patterns
  • Protocol
  • Lesson plan
  • Syllabus
  • Children’s Story
  • Picture book
  • Political editorial
  • Cartoon
  • Diagram
  • MindMap
  • Insight

How I Write

I’ll start with understanding clearly what I want to achieve.

    • What do I want my reader to “take away” after reading my writing?

Create a workable plan that will achieve that / those result(s)

    • What progression of content (to be created or curated / cited) will create that line of reasoning and shift in mental model?
    • What could make it most compelling?
    • Where shall I put this contribution / artifact?

Create an artifact with this plan.

    • The plan is a set of TODO items for the artifact
    • This plan is metacontent.
    • As sections of content get created, the metacontent can be “checked off” and made invisible
    • The metacontent can evolve as the content evolves. It’s essentially the “backlog” for the content creation project
    • Appendix / Final section: Where this document exists on the Internet. What single location is authoritative?

Once the metacontent has dwindled to “nothing”, the document / artifact is DONE.

Tamera is a School and Research Station for Realistic Utopia

Sheri Herndon writes about Tamera:

COMMUNITY BUILDING: CREATING A BASIS OF TRUST In the context of this balance between inner and outer peacework, in the center of the education and research of the GC are questions about what it means to live in healthy relations. How to create community: How do we create social systems that create trust and mutual respect? Community is essential for sustainability: the technologies of the future will only be regenerative and sustainable as far as the human communities function. Again and again, in ecological, social and political movements, we witness groups fail based on interpersonal conflict and unresolved inner structures. Community can be a powerful vessel to become conscious of these mostly unconscious steering mechanisms.
From a recent report from Tamera and their Global Campus Gathering. Those interested in the new models, this is a great summary and harvest of an epic gathering of world changers creating a culture of peace from the inside out, embodying this new culture in all our relations.

What is Dictipedia?

We each have our own diction, aka language. We use terms the way we understand them, regardless of whether they are completely consistent with the “correct” dictionary definitions. For basic everyday terms, this usually is not a problem, and usually no difficulty in the course of human interactions.

In domains with specialization of terms, eg. medicine, construction, sciences, and other highly skilled and technical areas of activity, these differences in meaning / definition / usage / implication / etc. can lead to project complications and even failures, if not caught and managed well.

Dictipedia is a toolset and set of practices that recognize and facilitate that “we each travel with our own language”, and that when we come together to collaborate, or to form teams, bringing these “languages” together is a necessary step in team formation.

Dictipedia:

    • Recognizes that we each have terms and phrases that carry certain meanings to each of us as individuals
    • Recognizes that we have potentially conflicting or at least inconsistent meanings when we use the same terms and phrases
    • Recognizes that explicating these terms and phrase differences for discussion and eventual resolution is a Good Thing in team formation
    • Recognizes that as we go from team to team, we pick up and migrate terms and phrases and bring them into our next teams
    • Assists in bringing forth the discussions necessary to align terms, phrases, and concepts
    • Assists in tracing the derivation of meanings from individual to individual, team to team, etc.
    • Assists in bringing language to the fore as a key First Class Object in team formation
    • Assists in disambiguating language so that the team can be in flow as quickly as possible

A dictipedia (noun) is an asset of an individual. A dictipedia is an asset of a team. Allowing teams to form with multiple individuals from potentially different backgrounds, and for teams to form, execute, dissolve, etc. is a key tenet of dictipedia’s services.

Much more coming…

What is Collaborology?

Collaborology is the theory and practice of successful scalable collaboration

Ultimately to the level where planetary issues can be addressed by us as a people (all citizens of Earth).

    • This includes studies of how success happens, but also
    • How failure happens.
    • Collaborology addresses the collaboration externals (tools, protocols, artifacts, etc) as well as
    • Collaboration internals (development, tools, presentation, maturity, etc. of collaborating individuals).
    • We will evolve the formal object model of collaborology.
    • We will characterize failure modes.
    • We will characterize success modes.
    • We will provide insights and guidance for different scales and objectives of teams and projects.
    • Collaborology addresses atomic collaboration (1:1 between 2 individuals, or 1:0 an individual with self), and scales upward.

Collaborology includes practices such as

    • CCC (Communication and Commitment to Collaborate)
    • COI (practices of self and peer accountability and community)
    • Identity (Transparency within a “circle of trust”)

If Collaborology can be well enough understood as to become a “hard science”, the mathematics of collaborology may be developed: Sociomatics.

What is WYSIWYDo?

WYSIWYDo is the infrastructure (tooling, applications, protocols, practices, principles,…) to support atomic-level collaboration: The 2-person agreement. WYSIWYDo is intended to scale from this micro-level to macro-level collaboration at global scale.

    • WYSIWYDo incorporates a basic state model for collaborative interactions. It is simple, but extensible.
    • WYSIWYDo recommends a protocol for negotiating (exploring, requesting, confirming, executing, confirming, closing) action items.
    • WYSIWYDo incorporates an extension model whereby it can integrate seamlessly with other applications and services.
    • WYSIWYDo will be available on the web, as well as on mobile devices in order to always be available to support collaborative interactions.

 

Much more to be added here… This is just a placeholder start.

What is Tweach?

Tweach is an experiment in crowdsourcing life lessons, HOWTO’s, etc. and an attempt to leverage “big data” to come up with how we can guide ourselves and our next generations, based on what previous generations have learned and passed on. It’s an attempt to use Twitter (mostly, though other social media forums could work as well) to share what we learned when.

Proposed Hashtags:

  • #WhenIwas1
  • #WhenIwas2
  • #WhenIwas3
  • #WhenIwas29
  • #WhenIwasInMy20’s
  • #WhenIwasInMy30’s
  • #WhenIwasInMy40’s
  • #WhenIwasInMy50’s
  • #WhenIGraduatedHS
  • #WhenIGotBS
  • #WhenIGotBA
  • #WhenIGotMS
  • #WhenIGotMA
  • #WhenIGotPhD
  • #WhenIGotFired
  • #WhenIGotHired
  • #WhenIGotMarried
  • #WhenIGotDivorced
  • #WhenMyDogDied
  • #WhenMyWifeDied
  • #WhenMy…
  • #WhenI…
  • … lots to be defined

Each of us posts what we learned, with one of these tags. Once enough of us do this, there’s lots to be done with “big data” and pattern analysis to compile very interesting complement to “wikipedia”. Obviously this grows and morphs over time and contributions.

KFJournal.org RoE

Here’s a quick version of how we’ve (Amigos) agreed to utilize KFJournal.org:

    • We each will blog wherever we are most comfortable.
    • If it’s NOT at KFJournal, we will post a link to that blog at KFJournal
    • Add your blog to a category. If no category exists, create one if you think it’s sensible and appropriate.
    • If you want to COMMENT or review another’s blog, do it there (where it is originally posted), or write in your favorite blogging location, and link to it, citing the article you are reviewing / commenting on.

Follow on to: “Thanks to Frode

Here’s an example RoE for a project team I ran a few years ago: Gucci

We will revise this as we need.

8 Artifacts To Seed a Project Team

When a new project or team forms, I like to create or designate these minimal 8 artifacts in the shared memory (knowledge repository). This can be a wiki, or something more sophisticated, but here they are:

    1. Contacts List – Who are we and how can we contact each other?
    2. Glossary – What terms do we use and what do they mean?
    3. Project Charter – Why does this project / team exist?
    4. Rules of Engagement – How do we work with each other?
    5. Chronolog – Communications, esp meetings notes
    6. Action Item Tracking System – How do we track what needs to be done?
    7. Calendar – What happens when
    8. References – Links to other related and relevant material

Let’s take a closer look at each:

  1. Contacts List. This should be a list of who, role, contact info – so that anyone can reach anyone else, whenever needed (even 24/7). Collaboration typically starts with “Let’s work together”, though after a project has been in existence for a while, “joining a collaboration” is more operational than “forming new collaboration”
  2. Glossary. The team keeps its terms explicitly visible. Where are may be alternative meanings, they are kept until the team resolves into new terminology, or resolves differences among the multiple meanings / definitions. At creation of a new collaboration, the key foundational concepts / terms can be captured to start such a glossary, and this serves to orient subsequent new members to the team.
  3. Project Charter. This is a statement of WHY the project or team has been formed. It should be clear enough that prioritizing any other decision or action can be assessed as necessary or irrelevant with respect to this charter. The charter is built out of the seed terms, by the seed founding team. The charter can be revised when appropriate, as decided by the team itself. Eventually, the charter should stabilize as the team understands what its purpose, mission, and goals are.
  4. Rules of Engagement. This is HOW the team will utilize its collective skills and resources to accomplish its objective, including deciding HOW. This needs to be acknowledged by each team member, and ought be created by the founding team members (one or more, up to all).
    Elements are:

    • Team Decisions. Decisions that have already been adopted by the team that should be the first practice of newcomers. Practices and decisions can be reviewed by the team if new information / options are available.
      • How do we make decisions?
      • Where do we keep our work?
      • How do we communicate with each other?
      • How do we change a decision?
      • How do we add members to this team?
      • How do we expel members from this team?
      • How do we manage assets? liabilities?
      • Legal issues / questions / ownership / liabilities / asset management
    • Use cases. Use cases are the WHAT that the team will do.
    • Methods. Methods are HOW to do the WHAT.
  5. Chronolog. A time-ordered log of team activities helps provide historical context for decisions, and also for newcomers to the team so that they can assimilate this history without requiring inordinate overhead from existing team members for onboarding the newcomer. Past decisions can be seen in temporal context, and the raw materials can be used to be authoritative.
  6. Action Item Tracking System. Actions taken as a result of planning, or meetings, or other team function, can be tracked in an AITS so that progress along all threads of activities can be explicitly visible and transparently shared among all team members. Sequences of actions create projects or larger-scale collaboration frameworks, but atomically all break down into specific action items.
  7. Calendar. This allows standard time-based views to be seen in forms familiar to those used to planning things in calendar mode. A calendar that is project-centric needs to offer events and other time-tagged objects that can then be viewed in personal calendars. This way, a project-centric sense of momentum, status, direction, etc. can be leveraged, although personal tracking will likely be based on personal calendars.
  8. References. These can be background material that provides context for THIS specific project / team, such as: guidelines, meeting minutes, related technical detail, competition, activities in the ecosystem, relevant vision statements, etc. A single place for such references assists all team members to sharing equal access to 3rd party content.

These eight artifacts are not meant to be comprehensive; it is merely suggested that these seed initial artifacts can accelerate the team’s achievement of PERFORMANCE mode.

More details later…